La Piadina Italian Flatbread

This soft and versatile flatbread, a common street food in Italy, comes from the Northern province of Emilia-Romagna. We are hoping that it will become a favorite of yours, too. It is quick and easy to make, and it makes a delicious light lunch or brunch. Our Organic Edison yields it a lovely golden color and light, buttery flavor.

Elle Cowan

Prep Time

35 minutes

Bake Time

5-10 minutes

Total Time

1 hour 45 minutes

Yield

4 Piadina flatbreads

Ingredients:

1¾ cup (225g) Organic Edison flour

1¼ teaspoons (7.5g) sea salt

¼ cup (50g) lard, at room temperature* (see Baker’s Notes)

⅜ cup (100g) water, at room temperature

Baker's Notes:

* You can often find lard at your local butchers shop. In Italy, it is traditional to use pork lard or beef tallow, but if lard is not available, or if you prefer to not use it, you can substitute for 3 tablespoons (40g) of olive oil. The texture and flavor will be slightly different though, not quite as fluffy.

 

** The dough will shrink a little over an inch in diameter during the cooking process.

 

*** The most traditional filling is squacquerone cheese, prosciutto, and arugula, but piadina is highly customizable. Feel free to use any variety of meats, cheeses, veggies, fresh greens or even go the sweet route and top with fresh fruits, honey, or Nutella.

Instructions:

  1. Combine flour and salt in a medium bowl. Use a whisk to combine. 
  2. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and add the lard and water.
  3. Using your hands, begin to combine the lard and water in the well, creating a paste-like consistency, slowly, little by little incorporating more flour to form the dough.
  4. As it begins to come together, you can knead the dough in the bowl, pressing down with your palm, incorporating more flour as you continue kneading.
  5. Once the dough has mostly come together, you may want to begin kneading the dough on a table or countertop, just for a few minutes until smooth.
  6. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap or cover with a tea towel and let rest for 30 minutes to allow the gluten to relax.
  7. After resting, portion the dough into 4 equal-sized portions (95g/piece) and roll each piece into a ball. Cover again with plastic wrap or tea towel.
  8. Preheat a large skillet or flat top on medium/high heat; be sure it is large enough to fit the piadina.
  9. Using a rolling pin, roll out the ball into a very thin 9” diameter circle. The dough will be almost translucent. Repeat with the remaining dough** (see Baker’s Notes).
  10. If you are short on counter space, you can stack the pieces, layering parchment inbetween, until you’re ready to cook them. Be sure to cover the top piadina so it does not dry out. 
  11. To start cooking, take the piadina sitting on the top of your stack and place the top, drier side, down onto the hot skillet first. Cook on medium/high heat for a few minutes. 
  12. Once you see the dough begin to bubble, flip it over and continue to cook. If you see very large bubbles forming, pierce them slightly with the tip of a knife.
  13. Continue to flip and cook the padina until it is thoroughly cooked and the bubbles are golden to dark brown. Make sure not to overcook them or they will get tough and crack when you try to fold them. 
  14. Cover the freshly-cooked padina with a lid of a skillet or an overturned bowl to keep warm. You don’t want them to dry out or cool down too much they are best served warm. 
  15. Repeat with the remaining piadina until all are cooked. 
  16. Once they are all done, you can begin to add the fillings. Starting with the cheese, spreading all around so it can melt and be distributed more easily and evenly, followed by the fresh greens, a little olive oil and meats or vegetables of your choice*** (see Baker’s Notes). 
  17. Fold in half, cut down the middle and serve. It’s best eaten right away.

Baker's Notes:

* You can often find lard at your local butchers shop. In Italy, it is traditional to use pork lard or beef tallow, but if lard is not available, or if you prefer to not use it, you can substitute for 3 tablespoons (40g) of olive oil. The texture and flavor will be slightly different though, not quite as fluffy.

 

** The dough will shrink a little over an inch in diameter during the cooking process.

 

*** The most traditional filling is squacquerone cheese, prosciutto, and arugula, but piadina is highly customizable. Feel free to use any variety of meats, cheeses, veggies, fresh greens or even go the sweet route and top with fresh fruits, honey, or Nutella.


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